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Mental and Behavioral Health Blog

Let’s Remove the Mental Health Stigma

 //   //  Insider

People with mental health issues are some of the most stigmatized, marginalized and disadvantaged members in our society. The negative connotations and false information related with mental illness is as harmful as the disease itself. Persons with mental illnesses are commonly described as dangerous, scary, lazy, or viewed with pity (Corrigan & Penn 1999). Stigma has far reaching effects on an individual that include lack of employment opportunities, housing limitations, and barriers to obtaining and receiving treatment services (Alexander & Link, 2003). In addition, it has negative consequences on an individual’s self-esteem and motivation to seek out mental health care (Corrigan, Druss & Perlick, 2014). Mitigating stigma related to people with mental illness is a difficult mission. In order to change attitudes, initiatives at the structural and individual level can be implemented to increase knowledge and acceptance of individuals with psychiatric illness.

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Mental Health Statistics You Need to Know

 //   //  Psychiatric data

Research on mental health conditions and their validated, empirically-based treatments is prevalent. For many conditions, gold standards of care have been established. In recent years, there have been growing movements aimed at increasing awareness of mental health issues, and for reducing stigma, on social media platforms.  

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10 Industry-Leading EHRs To follow on Twitter

 //   //  Insider

In today’s digital world, smart phones, tablets and web-enabled devices have significantly transformed our lives, and how we communicate. There’s now a more seamless flow of information within the healthcare sector, courtesy of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). The healthcare industry is an information-rich enterprise – and with EHRs, information is available whenever and wherever it’s needed. EHRs encompass and leverage digital progress and have transformed the way care is delivered and compensated, usually resulting in better care for patients.

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Ease Physician Burnout with Technology for Integrating Care

 //   //  Insider

Doctors are tired. They’re depressed and burned-out. And who can blame them? They are dealing with constantly changing regulations that are exhausting to keep up with, and increased reporting requirements that are taking away valuable time which could be better spent with their patients. Primary care physicians are getting the brunt of this growing problem.

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Integrating Primary and Behavioral Healthcare: Key to Reducing Costs?

 //   //  Insider

When did we start differentiating “physical health” and “mental health?” Isn’t it all just health? Treating patients holistically could be the secret to reducing healthcare costs while improving the quality of care. Sure, it might sound like an oxymoron – an impossible feat even – but is it?  

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Should Mental Health Be a Primary-Care Doctor’s Job?

 //   //  Insider

Patients occasionally ask me if I’ll be the doctor who’ll take out a gallbladder or deliver a baby. I tell them, “You deserve better.” I’m a primary-care internist, and my expertise is broader than it is deep. I manage high blood pressure and cholesterol, but refer people with heart attacks to cardiologists; I perform Pap tests and prescribe birth-control pills, but send pregnant women to obstetricians; and I often diagnose, but never treat, cancer.

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This Woman's Depression Tattoo Is Going Viral For The Best Reason

 //   //  Depression

“This is the conversation we need to have.”   Battling the Mental Health Stigma After being diagnosed with depression last year, 20-year-old student Bekah Miles decided to get a tattoo that accurately captured her battle with the disorder. She posted a picture of the tattoo on Facebook along with a few words about her personal experience. The image reads "I'm fine" to most, but from Miles' perspective, the tattoo says "save me." The artwork -- and Miles' accompanying post -- is an honest insight into what it really means to suffer from depression.

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Bad Therapy: 10 Signs That You Need a New Therapist

 //   //  Psychosis

Posted on August 10, 2015 by Courtney Stivers, PhD in For Everyone, Marriage and Family Therapy  If you are in counseling now or consider seeking a therapist in the future, it is important to choose a counselor who is the right fit for you. I am always saddened to hear of an individual or couple giving up on counseling after one bad experience. Therapists are each unique in their specific approaches and you deserve one who is qualified to meet your needs. Here are a few signs that you may need a new therapist. #1 Connection is Missing It is well researched that the therapeutic alliance, or relationship, with the therapist and client is likely the single biggest predictor of success in therapy (Martin, Garske, & Davis, 2000). If you do not feel a connection or trust starting to build between you and your therapist, it might be time to consider a change. #2 No Improvement You see a therapist for several months and do not feel that any progress has been made. You might even feel worse after every session. Some issues take longer to solve or learn to manage than others, but if there is no hope for change…you might need a new therapist. #3 Lack of Boundaries Your counselor seems to forget that you are a client. They talk to you in depth about their own personal life or problems with no apparent therapeutic purpose. Maybe they seem a bit too interested in the details of your sex life. They want to be buddies outside of the therapy room while you are still a client. It sounds like they have boundary issues. #4 Distractions Your therapist seems to have trouble paying attention. They take calls or text during sessions. They seem to be thinking about something else. Maybe they even fall asleep.  Not only is this rude, but you are paying them for a service. This is your time. #5 Focus is on the Therapist It is not a good sign if your counselor monopolizes your therapy hour by talking about him or herself. A certain amount of self-disclosure is probably therapeutic, but the therapist should not do the overwhelming majority of the talking. If you cannot seem to get a word in during your session, you need a new therapist. #6 Never Neutral Your therapist clearly always aligns with you or with your spouse on every issue. Yes, there are times when a therapist might agree with one person on a concern, but this should not be a constant taking of sides. It makes me think that the therapist has a personal issue that is appearing in the therapy office. #7 Feeling Shamed and Judged Feeling guilt because you are doing something or have done something that conflicts with your belief system might be a very appropriate response to a situation. A therapist can explore this without shaming a client and making him or her feel bad about who they are. If you feel constantly judged by your therapist, you need a new one. #8 Violating Your Belief System Every therapist has his or her own set of personal values. We cannot “not” have them. As counselors, we are not allowed to push our beliefs on others. This does not mean we cannot explore issues like spirituality, but simply that we cannot force our own values on you. #9 Not Qualified or a Specialist Some therapists claim to be able to treat a wide variety of issues. Many therapists truly are generalists, but I recommend that you seek a therapist that specializes in your presenting issue. They may have specialty certifications or degrees in that area. I have heard horrible stories about a therapist blaming a spouse for a client’s addiction, and the therapist was simply not trained properly in addiction. This can be very damaging. #10 Cancelling or Showing Up Late This happens to all of us from time to time. If they are consistently late or cancelling often, it shows that they are not respectful of you or your time. Your counselor expects you to show up for appointments and they owe you the same courtesy. In the end, you need to trust your gut. If you have a bad feeling about a therapist, I would find a new one. If you have a bad feeling about ten therapists, then something might be off with your gut feeling. Do you agree with these red flags? Please share below.

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Mental health disorders are the most common diseases of childhood

 //   //  Psychiatric data

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